6 Best Substitutes for Cellophane or Glass noodles

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Cellophane noodles are a popular item in Asian cuisines, but they can be hard to find. If you’re looking for an alternative to cellophane or glass noodles, here is a list of the six best substitutes!

Substitutes for Cellophane or Glass noodles

Cellophane noodles are a type of noodle that is made from mung bean starch and water. A lot of people enjoy these because they have a chewy texture, which makes them the perfect addition to many dishes in Asian cuisine.

If you cannot find cellophane noodles in your grocery store or if you just want to try something new, there are several alternatives that will work well for any dish you’re making!

Glass noodles can be cooked in just 5 minutes and they come in a variety of flavors that will keep your palate happy. The one downside is that they often contain MSG (monosodium glutamate), which many people have sensitivities to.

You may not know this, but there are many substitutes for cellophane or glass noodles. If you can’t find them at your grocery store, try Rice vermicelli, Soba noodles, Angel hair pasta, Lo mein, Udon, or Rice sticks.

What are Glass noodles?

Glass noodles are a type of pasta made from mung bean starch. They’re also called cellophane or glass vermicelli, and they come in various shapes including spaghetti-like strands, round pieces, and rice-sized beads.

Glass noodles are gluten free which makes them an appealing option for those with celiac disease or dietary restrictions. The texture of the noodle is chewy but not sticky like some other types of Asian pastas such as lo mein noodles or rice sticks.

It’s best to prepare glass noodles by soaking them in cold water until soft before boiling them for about 5 minutes to cook through.

6 Best Substitutes for Cellophane or Glass noodles

Cellophane or glass noodles are a popular ingredient in many recipes, but they can be difficult to find. If you’re looking for an alternative that is just as versatile and delicious, the following six ingredients will serve your needs well.

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Note: These are made from grains or vegetables and preparations will vary depending on the type of noodles!

Rice vermicelli

Cellophane noodles are a popular ingredient in many Asian dishes, but they have the downside of being quite calorie-dense.

Rice vermicelli is an alternative that may be more appealing to people who want to cut calories or carbs from their diet. With only 20 calories per cup and no carbohydrates, rice vermicelli can provide a filling alternative to cellophane noodles for those trying to lose weight.

In addition, it has the added benefit of not breaking as easily when stir-fried as cellophane noodles do!

Soba noodles

Soba noodles are a delicious alternative to cellophane noodles. Traditionally made from buckwheat, soba noodles have a nutty taste and chewy texture that is perfect for soups or stir-fry dishes.

Soba noodles are also gluten free which makes them an excellent option for those with gluten sensitivities, Celiac disease, or who follow a vegan diet.

The best part about these tasty Japanese-style noodles is that they cook quickly! Throw some veggies in the pot and your dinner will be on the table in 20 minutes!

Angel hair pasta

Have you ever considered swapping your standard cellophane noodles with Angel hair pasta? It is a great alternative to the more traditional type of noodle.

The best thing about this swap is that it’s quick and easy. You can cook up a batch in just five minutes! Give it a try next time you’re making Chinese food!

Lo mein

Lo mein noodles are a great substitute for cellophane noodles. They have a similar texture, but they’re made from wheat flour instead of mung bean starch.

You can find them at most Asian markets. They’re perfect for adding to your favorite recipe that calls for cellophane noodles!

Udon

Udon noodles are a traditional Japanese noodle. They have a heartier texture and chew than your typical cellophane noodles.

Udon noodles can be served cold or hot, in soups or stir-fries. If you’re looking for an alternative to the standard cellophane noodle, try substituting them with udon!

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Rice sticks

Cellophane noodles are made from mung bean starch and water and have a very low calorie count. Rice sticks on the other hand, are made by drying rice flour dough then steaming it which makes them much more nutritious than the former.

Rice sticks noodles have a similar crunchy texture but are made from whole grains instead of processed starches like corn or potato starch which many other noodle substitutes contain.

How to store noodles?

Noodles are a staple food in many households and we want to make sure you know how to store them for longer shelf life.  Here is the best way:

Store noodles in an airtight container or resealable plastic bag, away from light and heat.  The storage temperature should be between 60-80 degrees Fahrenheit; if not, it may cause the noodles to become stale.

Mold can also grow on noodles that have been stored for too long so be careful! To prevent mold growth, always keep your noodles dry and don’t leave them out of their package or container for too long.

Where to buy Glass noodles or Cellophane noodles?

Glass noodles are available in most Asian grocery stores, but they’re not always easy to find. If you can’t find them where you usually shop, try searching for them online or asking a friend who’s more familiar with the cuisine.

Cellophane noodles are also called mung bean threads and glass vermicelli. In addition to being used as an ingredient in dishes such as pad Thai and Vietnamese Pho, these thin noodle strands are often served on their own as a side dish or snack.

As one of the most common ingredients found in Thai food dishes, it is easy to see why these long silky white strings have become so popular all over Asia!

Watch Video: How to prepare and cook cellophane noodles - Marion's Kitchen

Final Thoughts

In conclusion, there are many cellophane noodles substitutes that can help you get more creative in the kitchen. Use these alternatives and think outside of the box and make your dishes unique!

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Substitutes for Cellophane or Glass noodles

Substitutes for Cellophane or Glass noodles

Yield: 6
Prep Time: 13 minutes
Total Time: 13 minutes

Cellophane noodles are a popular item in Asian cuisines, but they can be hard to find. If you’re looking for an alternative to cellophane or glass noodles, here is a list of the six best substitutes!

Ingredients

  • Rice vermicelli
  • Soba noodles
  • Angel hair pasta
  • Lo mein
  • Udon
  • Rice sticks

Instructions

    1. Pick any substitute from the list above.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Are rice noodles and cellophane noodles the same?

Cellophane noodles are made from mung bean flour and water while rice noodles are made with rice flour which is why they’re more gluten-free than the other option. They also tend to be chewier due to the starch content in the ingredients so it’s important to cook them properly or else you’ll end up with mushy and tasteless food.

Can you substitute rice noodles for cellophane noodles?

There are many different types of noodles that people use in their cooking. Rice noodles and cellophane noodles are a common type of noodle used in Asian dishes, but they have a few differences between them. Cellophane noodles are made from mung bean flour and water while rice noodles are made with rice flour which is why they’re more gluten free than the other option. They also tend to be chewier due to the starch content in the ingredients so it’s important to cook them properly or else you’ll end up with mushy and tasteless food. Each recipe might require its type of noodles, but you can substitute cellophane with rice noodles.

Are vermicelli noodles the same as cellophane noodles?

Cellophane noodles are made from mung bean starch or sweet potato starch. They’re translucent in color and have a slightly chewy texture. Vermicelli noodles on the other hand are made from wheat flour and eggs so they come out white when cooked. Both types of noodles can be boiled to make them softer or fried to give them a crispier texture but the differences between these two leading styles of Asian pasta still remain.

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